What I Wrote This Week – #NaNoWriMo Edition

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“We’re going to lose the war.”
“Wars don’t have winners.”
Emmerson sighs, “You know what I mean,” she says. “I have a plan though, but it doesn’t work without you. Or-“

Excerpt from this week’s #GroundhogOne efforts (who is Emmerson? Good question), and proof that I DID actually write this week.

I’m not going to lie and say that my NaNoWriMo efforts are going swimmingly, because they’re really not. Writing is difficult, and there’s a chance I’ve gotten stuck. Oh well, shit happens. That doesn’t mean I’m giving up on this story, because I’m not, but it’s going to take a little longer than I thought to get it to where I want it to be.

Going into this year’s NaNoWriMo, I knew that there was a chance something like this would happen, because this really is an ambitious project, and it’s a kind of story I’ve never tried to write before (okay, scratch that, not never, but it’s been a VERY long time and the thing that I did write that would be considered ‘similar’ is…also not similar at all. I digress).

My initial plan going into this was to write this story in order.

Let’s just say that that went out the window, but here’s why it’s a GOOD thing that it did.

What I realized this week (aka the span of time between last Thursday’s post and this one) is that there’s no reason for me NOT to write certain scenes that I’ve already thought up. There really isn’t. Why would or should I STOP myself from writing something that’s going to be in the story ANYWAY?

So, I went ahead and created a ‘Misc’ document in the Scrivener file (don’t know what Scrivener is? It’s like Word, but awesome. Use it. 10/10 would recommend) and started writing all the scenes that happen AFTER the last scene I left off on, which yes, includes the end. I’ve mentioned before in my Writing Tips posts, that knowing in advance how and where your story is going to end is critically important to finishing your story. If you don’t know how it’s supposed to end, how are you going to get TO the ending? I know most people aren’t like me and don’t know how EXACTLY it’s going to go down, but all you need is a vague idea, a vague endpoint, and drive your story in that general direction. It may change, it probably will change, but as long as you have a direction, you’ll be set.

Now, I may be about 10,000 words behind where I should be for NaNoWriMo standards, but that doesn’t mean I’m giving up on #GroundhogOne, even if things are getting a little crazy at work and the holidays are starting up. Like I did with the #WhoIsTalyaNightingale novel, I’m going to write when I have time, whenever I can. It may be a little at a time, but a little at a time is not the same as NOT writing. We can’t all sit down and bang out 5,000 words or more a day. That’s always the goal, but even for people who are full-time writers, that doesn’t happen for every.single.writing.session. Temper your expectations and understand that writing is as challenging as any other art. You’re creating a world that ONLY exists in your head. Only you can do that. It may take longer than others, but you can and will accomplish your goal as you keep working at it.

AND, as another bonus to saying ‘screw it’ to writing #GroundhogOne in order is that I now know some other things that are going to happen in the story, which I wouldn’t have figured out if I pressed on with my original plan of writing in order. There’s going to be space fights, arguments, an attempt at infiltrating a prison that’s going to go SUPER wrong, like, wronger than the other attempts at infiltrating said prison (and even as I think about this, an attempt that’s going to go SUPER WRONGER than any of the other times I’ve planned on writing. Here’s another short tangent: talk it out. Sometimes, if you get stuck, if you talk about what you’re working on, you’ll go in ways you never imagined if you just talk to someone or write it out. Try it.), and a realization about birthdays.

Remember friends, in space, no one can hear you if you never finish your book. So, don’t be like space.

Also, maybe don’t try to write your What I Wrote This Week post before the coffee’s kicked in.

The writing adventures continue, and now I need to figure out how to kill off my characters in the fun news ways that I just figured out as I was typing this post.

Need some resources? Don’t forget my Writing Tips page, or the NaNoWriMo Writing Tips Countdown, which starts with Part One, and the rest of it is linked below this paragraph. Need prompts? Well, I have hundreds in the Prompt Library, or the exclusive Prompt eBooks in the Shop. Don’t forget that 100 Original Writing Prompts by TFR is on sale of 99 cents, all NaNoWriMo long. Or head on over to the NaNoWriMo forums for advice and inspiration of any and all kinds.

Part One: 4 Reasons Why You Should Participate In @NaNoWriMo

Part Two: 6 Tips For A Successful @NaNoWriMo

Part Three: 5 Ways To Focus During @NaNoWriMo

Part Four: Pre-@NaNoWriMo #MondayMotivation

Part Five: 3 Reasons Why It’s Not About Winning @NaNoWriMo

All NaNoWriMo long, 100 Original Writing Prompts by TFR is on sale of 99 cents!
BUY NOW

Writing Prompts eBook Volume 1 COVER
Click to shop the exclusive Writing Prompt eBooks: https://goo.gl/uMjpDq

Like what you read? Want to see more?

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

-Kathryn, the Fake Redhead

What I Wrote This Week – #NaNoWriMo Edition

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All NaNoWriMo long, 100 Original Writing Prompts by TFR is on sale of 99 cents!
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“Maybe that’s why,” he says after a minute. “Maybe we’re not supposed to die for this.”
It sounds right, but it also sounds a lot like wishful thinking so—

Excerpt from this week’s #GroundhogOne efforts.

Remember how last week I said I kicked off Day One of NaNoWriMo with 1,800 words? And also how I said that it probably wasn’t going to last all month long? Spoiler alert: I was right. Due to a couple factors, including my cat biting at my ankles all the time, a blazing migraine and my inability to get out of my own damn way, I’ve fallen a bit behind on my word count. According to the NaNoWriMo number crunchers, by today, Day 9, I should be ready to hit 15,000 words.

Fun fact: I am probably not going to reach 15,000 words today.

But it’s fine. At least I’m still writing, and yesterday even, I wrote a little over 2,000 words for the first time in about five or six days. When it comes to NaNoWriMo, ANY Progress is good progress, so I’m happy. This draft of #GroundhogOne isn’t going to be the next great sci-fi novel, but it’s going to be the STARTING POINT for the next great sci-fi novel. Or, specifically, A great sci-fi novel, since there are a LOT of great sci-fi novels that to great things in different ways. There’s nothing to say that one book is the be-all-end-all of all great books. Write the book that’s great for you. No one else but you.

Wow, I said ‘great’ a lot in that last paragraph. And digressed a bit.

So, I’m really happy with the progress I made last night, but here’s the thing about the progress I made: I didn’t write in order. Well, rephrase: I skipped ahead a bit. Okay, that’s not really the right way to say it either. The way I write isn’t what I’d call linear, but I’m still writing closer to linear than usual. I’ll explain:

Now, I haven’t written the end of the book yet (which I am known to do, and yes, I do know how the story is going to end, for reasons of knowing where its sequel #OneVendetta is going to begin, and the fact that you just need to know how your story is going to end ANYWAY), but I have written scenes that take place after scenes I haven’t written yet, but they’re not that far out of order, and they all connect in relation to the plot. This way, I’ll be able to use today (and probably tomorrow’s) writing sessions to fill in the gaps between the scenes with other scenes that I may or may not have completely thought up yet.

My point in this ramble is that there’s nothing wrong with writing the easy parts first, and then filling in the blanks. Two years ago, during NaNoWriMo 2015, I wrote the scenes AROUND all the fight scenes at the end of the story, and saved those pesky fight scenes for last. You’re allowed to do that. In fact, you’re allowed to write your story any damn way you please. There is no RIGHT way to write. You just have to write a scene, and then another, and then another, and then another, and after a long eventually, you’ll have a story.

This year’s NaNoWriMo is especially challenging because I’m writing off the seat of my pants, and that makes it a bit slow-going, but it doesn’t matter how long you take. If I don’t “win” NaNoWriMo, then I’m not going to be upset. It’s NOT about winning (for more on that, take a gander at my post from the NaNoWriMo Writing Tips Countdown: Part Five: 3 Reasons Why It’s Not About Winning @NaNoWriMo).

Just remember, fellow writers, to keep writing whenever you can. Whether you’re on pace, ahead of the game, or WAY behind, don’t feel discouraged. If you keep trying, you’ll definitely get there. If you get there in November, that’s great, if you get there in December, that’s great too. And if it takes you into 2018 to finish this first hack at your novel, the fact that you finished makes it amazing, no matter when you do it.

The writing adventures continue, and I’m off to figure out new and inventive ways to kill off my characters. I’ve offed my protagonist about five times so far, with four more deaths that are yet to be written. It’s going to be awesome.

Need some resources? Don’t forget my Writing Tips page, or the NaNoWriMo Writing Tips Countdown, which starts with Part One, and the rest of it is linked below this paragraph. Need prompts? Well, I have hundreds in the Prompt Library, or the exclusive Prompt eBooks in the Shop. Don’t forget that 100 Original Writing Prompts by TFR is on sale of 99 cents, all NaNoWriMo long. Or head on over to the NaNoWriMo forums for advice and inspiration of any and all kinds.

Part One: 4 Reasons Why You Should Participate In @NaNoWriMo

Part Two: 6 Tips For A Successful @NaNoWriMo

Part Three: 5 Ways To Focus During @NaNoWriMo

Part Four: Pre-@NaNoWriMo #MondayMotivation

Part Five: 3 Reasons Why It’s Not About Winning @NaNoWriMo

All NaNoWriMo long, 100 Original Writing Prompts by TFR is on sale of 99 cents!
BUY NOW

Writing Prompts eBook Volume 1 COVER
Click to shop the exclusive Writing Prompt eBooks: https://goo.gl/uMjpDq

Like what you read? Want to see more?

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

-Kathryn, the Fake Redhead

#MondayMotivation – Nov. 6, 2017

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The hard part about writing a novel is finishing it. – Ernest Hemmingway

Happy Monday Wrimos!

Six days into the challenge, how’s the writing going for you? I’ve got about 7,200 words down so far, which sounds like a lot, but is also a little bit behind what I wanted to accomplish, especially after this weekend, but things happen. Life happens. Naps happen.

And if you don’t think naps are necessary for writerly success, take a read at my Writing Tips post, 4 Reasons Why Breaks Are Good For Your ProductivitySo, I only wrote around 1,200 words this weekend (most of which were on Saturday night), but I’m not stressed, because I know I’ll make it back up and get back to what NaNoWriMo calls “to par”, eventually. Especially if I keep word-vomiting like I do.

And on the subject of word vomit: this draft is not pretty, and that’s the point.

For an event like NaNoWriMo, especially if you’re writing a novel completely from scratch like I am (a handful of story/character notes and some dialogue puts me firmly in the Pantser category), then it’s really more about getting a framework to go back to and make pretty later. I even tweeted the other night about writing a line that foreshadows the CRAP out of the book I’m planning to write to follow up on #GroundhogOne, but dude, for the life of me, I can’t remember what that line was. I scanned through the document to see if I could find it, but I can’t. I know it’s there, and when I read closer, I’m sure I’ll find it.

And let’s talk about why I’m not reading closer right now: because I can’t stop myself from editing the things I read.

I just can’t. It’s that decade I spent working in PR, which gives me very little self-control when it comes to editing (also eating, which is why I don’t keep sweets in the house, because I KNOW I will eat it all in one sitting, but that’s another story). So, I’m not reading closely what I’m writing of #GroundhogOne because I know I’ll get myself stuck and start editing, and when you’re doing something like trying to write 50,000 words in 30 days, nobody has time for that. Especially not me. So, sure the grammar’s atrocious and the sentences are formatted weird and I don’t even know what I’m saying half the time, but there’s time to go back into it and fix it later.

And back to what Hemingway’s talking about, you can’t finish a book you never write. So, I’m committed to focusing on writing the story, and once I’m done, I’ll go back and make it pretty.

So, here’s to a productive week of NaNo-ing or just writing, whatever you’re doing. Don’t forget to sign up for the #MondayMotivation Newsletter by clicking HEREThe next newsletter is slated to land in your inbox tonight, and while I just rambled on about how I’m not going to go back and read what I’ve written for #GroundhogOne, there’s a VERY HIGH chance I’ll share some bits I’m working on. So, don’t forget to SIGN UP.

Like what you read? Want to see more?
Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com
-Kathryn, the Fake Redhead

*#MondayMotivation quote found on my Pinterest Board: Inspirational Quotes About Writing

What I Wrote This Week – #NaNoWriMo Edition

All NaNoWriMo Long, Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For 99 Cents! |Writing Tips

Seventeen thousand, one hundred fifty-four of what? – excerpt from what I wrote on Day 1 of NaNoWriMo for #GroundhogOne.

NaNoWriMo 2017 is in full swing, and I kicked off Day One with a whopping 1,800 words. I know it sounds like a lot, and if you’re someone who couldn’t come up with that many, couldn’t reach whichever daily goal you set (be it 1,667 or more or less), don’t worry. For some people, it takes some time to get into the swing of NaNo-ing. I’m not going to have 29 more days where I bang out 1,800 words a day, for a lot of reasons. Some are because, you know, life gets in the way, the holidays are a thing, and other times, it’s because the words just don’t work for whatever scene I’m attempting.

These things all happen, and there’s no reason to feel bad about that or worry that you’re not going to hit your goal.

Some days I’m going to write a couple thousand words and be way ahead, other’s I’m going to write like, 12, and say, “Screw this, I need a nap.”

And I can safely say that the top reason why the words flowed so quick yesterday was that I KNEW what was going to happen in that scene, and since I am writing by the seat of my pants, I’m not always going to know exactly what I want to happen in order to get from Point A to Point B. Writing comes with a whole host of challenges, and plot is certainly one of them.

Remember,  you’re not going to get any writing done if you don’t try, so remember to try. You must just try. I’m posting updates about my writing trials and tribulations on Twitter (see: the accidental break I took because of something that happened on an episode of Property Brothers, among other things), which include some lines I’ve written that will eventually fit into the story, along with some retweets of advice from other writers who are diving into the adventure.

If you need some additional inspirational assistance don’t forget that, all month long, 100 Writing Prompts by TFR Volume One is on sale for just 99 cents! Need some craft-based advice? Head on over to the Writing Tips page for some advice on craft and world building and how to name your character or focus on getting your writing done. And don’t forget the five-part Writing Tips NaNoWriMo Countdown Series:

Part One: 4 Reasons Why You Should Participate In @NaNoWriMo

Part Two: 6 Tips For A Successful @NaNoWriMo

Part Three: 5 Ways To Focus During @NaNoWriMo

Part Four: Pre-@NaNoWriMo #MondayMotivation

Part Five: 3 Reasons Why It’s Not About Winning @NaNoWriMo

How’s your writing challenge going?

Writing Prompts eBook Volume 1 COVER

Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For 99 Cents!

Like what you read? Want to see more?

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

-Kathryn, the Fake Redhead

@NaNoWriMO 2017 Prompt eBook Exclusive

All NaNoWriMo Long, Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For 99 Cents! |Writing Tips

Happy NaNoWriMo Day!

It’s finally November 1! For those of you who have been impatiently waiting (like me) to start NaNoWriMo 2017, it’s here, it’s here! Let’s get writing! If you’ve been planning for months, or just decided to get started this week, don’t stress, just start writing and let the plot take you where it takes you. As a professional Pantser, I have an idea of where my plot is going to go, but I don’t REALLY know where it’s going to take me by the end of the month. But come on, that’s the fun part.

And for Part Six of my Writing Tips NaNoWriMo 2017 Countdown, here’s a special gift, from me to you!

Part Six: Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For 99 Cents!

Yes, you read that correctly, I’m knocking TWO dollars off the cost of my exclusive prompt ebook! This eBook is perfect for WriMos of all kinds looking for inspiration as they embark on their writing journey and I want to help any way I can! Not only that, but with the cost of Volume 1 so low, purchasing it with Volume 2 at $2.99 brings your total to just 3.98, which costs less than the current cost of the Volume 1&2 Bundle. You’re welcome!

Click Here To Purchase Your Copy For Only 99 Cents!

Writing Prompts eBook Volume 1 COVER

And as I begin my own NaNoWriMo 2017 writing journey, here’s a peak into the first words I wrote for #GroundhogOne this morning:

“Has this happened to you before?”

“All of this has happened before. So many times it’s not worth keeping count.”

For those of you interested in a refresher before you dive in to NaNoWriMo, here’s the rest of the series:

Part One: 4 Reasons Why You Should Participate In @NaNoWriMo

Part Two: 6 Tips For A Successful @NaNoWriMo

Part Three: 5 Ways To Focus During @NaNoWriMo

Part Four: Pre-@NaNoWriMo #MondayMotivation

Part Five: 3 Reasons Why It’s Not About Winning @NaNoWriMo

Remember, it’s about the writing journey, not the destination. Write as much as you can, remember to hydrate, and have fun!

Writing Prompts eBook Volume 1 COVER

All NaNoWriMo Long, Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For 99 Cents!

Like what you read? Want to see more?

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

-Kathryn, the Fake Redhead

3 Reasons Why It’s Not About Winning @NaNoWriMo

All NaNoWriMo Long, Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For Only 99 Cents!Writing Tips

Happy Halloween!

Now, I’m sure you’re wondering why Part Five of the Writing Tips NaNoWriMo 2017 Countdown series sounds like something that’s a bit of a downer, but as great as NaNoWriMo is, it’s really NOT all about ‘winning’ NaNoWriMo. So, welcome to:

Part Five: 3 Reasons Why It’s Not About Winning @NaNoWriMo

And the rest of the series

Part One: 4 Reasons Why You Should Participate In @NaNoWriMo

Part Two: 6 Tips For A Successful @NaNoWriMo

Part Three: 5 Ways To Focus During @NaNoWriMo

Part Four: Pre-@NaNoWriMo #MondayMotivation

Part Six: Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For 99 Cents!

NaNoWriMo is great, because not only is it a community of like-minded writers who are all crazy enough to dedicate a month to writing an entire novel, but it’s also an epic learning experience. And sure, the bonuses for winners (those who validate their word count, which I believe you can start doing during the last days of the event), are awesome, but they’re not everything.

You Learn Your Limits

Part of what makes NaNoWriMo, well, NaNoWriMo, is the concept of writing 50,000 words in 30 days, which breaks down to 1,667 words per day. I touched on this in one of the earlier countdown posts, but one of the greatest parts of this event is that you can figure out what a realistic daily world count goal is. It doesn’t have to be 1,667 words a day when you’re not NaNo-ing (hell, it doesn’t have to be 1,667 words a day when you ARE NaNo-ing, just write, and it’ll all work out in the end, even if that end takes longer than you hope.

Not everyone has the time to bang out 5,000 words a day. Not everyone can write 500 (though, that’s a really great starting point type goal to hit, because it’s just about two pages in a standard sized Word document. Some writers are slower (for a lot of reasons, including perfectionism, and more on that in a minute), some writers are faster, some writers have to drag the words out of their heads, some writers have more days where the words flow, compared to when they don’t.

NaNoWriMo is diving head-first into the unknown, and you learn a lot along the way. I learned that I could finish a novel for the first time in six years, that I COULD spend days at a time not checking my Tumblr account, that fight scenes aren’t impossible, and that, if I try, I can come up with something really freaking cool. It’s up to you to figure out what you’re going to take away from NaNoWriMo, but I don’t doubt that you WILL take at least one thing away from this event.

You Learn To Break Through Writer’s Block

Writer’s block comes in many forms. My first Writing Tips post was about the 6 Ways To Transition Out Of Writer’s Block, and I think that was important that it was my first post, because writers need to know that it’s inconvenient, not permanent. Many writers, including the full-time novelists we aspire to be, literally can’t afford to just succumb to writer’s block. And during NaNoWriMo, Wrimos who have dedicated themselves to finishing a novel in 30 days get a taste of that.

Because it doesn’t matter how the words get on the page, as long as they do. If there’s a scene you’re stuck on (for me in the #WhoIsTalyaNightingale novel, it was fight scenes, including the one at the end, which I didn’t actually finish to my standards for about a year), or you don’t know where to go, then you just need to write through the pain.

You must keep writing in order to finish your story. Just write.

You Realize That It’s Not About Getting It Perfect On The First Try

What you write during NaNoWriMo is called a novel, but here’s what it really is:

A draft.

This is a draft of a novel. And I’ll repeat: this is a draft of a novel.

That said, it doesn’t matter what words you put down, just as long as there are words that you put down. For me, as a writer, my second passes over my story are always my better passes over my story. That’s where I breathe life into it, so to speak. Why? Because your first draft is just a matter of getting the bones of the story out there, the framework. Without a framework of the universe you’re writing in, then you’re not going to be able to pull out the specifics and the little intricacies that make your world yours. Because it is yours.

In the email I got this morning from NaNoWriMo, it included a pep talk from writer Roxanne Gay, which was titled, “This is your novel and only you know how to write it.”

NaNoWriMo will teach you about yourself as a writer, how you write, what works for you, what doesn’t, what scenes you hate to write, even though you know you have to write them (see: fight scenes), what scenes you love to write, and how to move past things like sticky characterizations, characters you don’t like because they’re unlikeable, but you have to write them anyway (for more on that, take a read of 3 Ways To Write A Character You Hate, which is one of my most popular Writing Tips posts), and more.

If you don’t finish, don’t win, it’s okay. You win in a million other ways by just STARTING your novel during NaNoWriMo. No one says you have to finish it or reach 50,000 words. You might reach November 30 with only 40,000 words, or less. But that’s still thousands more words than you started with, and it won’t take much more pushing before those words become a novel-length story that you can go back into and edit into an amazing novel that you wrote, because you’re the only one who can.

No one can write the story that’s in your head. You can. It doesn’t matter how long it takes, but you can use NaNoWriMo to learn and grow as a writer, and get better at your craft, which is the most important part of this entire exercise.

So, have a safe and happy Halloween, and when November 1 rolls around tomorrow, get to writing. I’ll be there too. Find me on NaNoWriMo at KathrynR47, or check in on Twitter for rants about writing, and maybe a peak into what I’m writing for #GroundhogOne.

Good luck, and don’t forget to check back tomorrow for a special NaNoWriMo treat!

All NaNoWriMo Long, Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For Only 99 Cents!

Like what you read? Want to see more?

Buy Me a Coffee at ko-fi.com

-Kathryn, the Fake Redhead

#MondayMotivation – Two Days To @NaNoWriMo

All NaNoWriMo Long, Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For Only 99 Cents!
Writing Tips

The secret of getting ahead is getting started. – Mark Twain

So, this #MondayMotivation quote (which I will get to unpacking following a bit of ramble, as I do), did not actually come from my Inspirational Quotes About Writing board on Pinterest. A friend, who actually took over my position at my old job picked it out for a #MondayMotivation graphic he’s using for this week, and I thought it was fitting in the days leading up to NaNoWriMo. Welcome to:

Part Four: Pre-@NaNoWriMo #MondayMotivation

And the rest of the series

Part One: 4 Reasons Why You Should Participate In @NaNoWriMo

Part Two: 6 Tips For A Successful @NaNoWriMo

Part Three: 5 Ways To Focus During @NaNoWriMo

Part Five: 3 Reasons Why It’s Not About Winning @NaNoWriMo

Part Six: Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For Only 99 Cents!

Let’s talk about getting started.

Blank pages are incredibly intimidating. Like, so incredibly intimidating it’s not even funny. How are you supposed to just…start? Especially if you’ve already written a novel before, it’s easy to forget how you got from blank page to thousands of words in a document you’ve backed up 82 times and saved to 45 different places (seriously, save your work religiously, you guys. I’ve been burned before and it is NOOOOOOOOOOOT fun).

But here’s a little trick I like to use to get around that apprehension you may feel about starting something as intimidating as your first of 50,000 words in 30 days:

Don’t start with a blank document.

What do I mean? Well, I’m the type of person who is constantly writing (or thinking about it) and prepping and noting down plot ideas and little pieces of dialogue for the stories I’m going to write (I wouldn’t say it’s an outline, but it’s a general idea of what events are going to be included. I’m much more a Pantser than I am a Planner). So, I already have a little bit of content that I can work off of when November 1 rolls around and I get serious about getting the words out for #GroundhogOne. It’s not much, it’s not even 1,000 words, and they’re not remotely in order, but it’s something I take take to get started, and that’s the point of NaNoWriMo. It’s starting something that, if you work at it and persevere through moments of writer’s block or distraction, will eventually become a complete story that, if you get lucky, will become an actual novel.

The very first novel I wrote (the one I mentioned in Part Three about finding a writing space and using the study room in my dorm my freshman year of college), started with me imagining an argument between two people. I didn’t have names, I didn’t have details about what they were arguing about, other than one person being really angry with the other. But I turned that into a novel that had about seven planned sequels, and a prequel, and even almost a decade later, I know basically everything that’s going to happen with that story. I haven’t touched that story in years, it’s not great, and one day I may go back to it and do something with it, but it started with dreaming up an argument and ended with a story.

But it became a story with seven planned sequels and a prequel because I started writing book one.

And I dabbled in storyline after storyline in the years after finishing that story, and eventually stumbled on the idea for the #WhoIsTalyaNightingale novel, which was inspired by my annoyance at how queer characters are treated in the media (if I see one more incident of burying your gays, I’m going to be pissed), the lack of female superheroes who don’t need rescuing by a Strong!Male!Hero!, and an episode of CS!: New York. Among other things. But it works, and somehow I went from Point A, in which Talya Nightingale wasn’t even called Talya Nightingale, and she was hiding out on a farm in Montana with a PR guru I created for another story, to Point B, where Talya Nightingale is Talya Nightingale, has no idea why she’s Talya Nightingale or what she did to be stranded on Earth without her memories, and buys a house in a weird town that has a giant lake shaped like a bird.

So, if starting with a blank word document is too intimidating for you, don’t. Start writing somewhere else, like a note on your phone or a couple pages of notebook paper by hand, and THEN start.

But you have start before you can finish. So, come Wednesday, join me in starting whatever project you’ve been waiting for the so-called perfect moment to start. There never going to be a perfectly perfect moment to start, so you must take advantage of ANY moment, and write.

All NaNoWriMo Long, Get Writing Prompts By TFR Volume 1 For Only 99 Cents!

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-Kathryn, the Fake Redhead